E Visa Power Rankings

The existence of a treaty is the first requirement for obtaining an E visa. Below are the power rankings for E visa treaty countries based on duration of visa validity. The rankings are organized along the ROYGBV scale as follows:

60-month validity

48-month validity

24 to 36-month validity

12-month validity

Less than 12-month validity

0-month validity (but still listed in the
FAM)

The reason for this ranking system is that visa validity is likely the most important factor for a potential investor or trader. Reciprocity fees are likely to be less than .01 of the qualifying trade or investment value. Every treaty country national that may obtain a visa valid for one year or more may also obtain a multiple entry visa. Iranian E-1s are essentially the only country in the purple category. As only one factor was used in these rankings, information that may affect a country’s rank is welcome in the comments section.

Country

Visa

Classification

Fee

Number

of Entries

Validity

Period

Albania

E-2

None

Multiple

36 Months

Argentina

E-1

None

Multiple

60 Months

Argentina

E-2

None

Multiple

60 Months

Armenia

E-2

None

Multiple

60 Months

Australia[1]

E-1

$105.00

Multiple

48 Months[2]

Australia[3]

E-2

$105.0

Multiple

48 Months[4]

Austria

E-1

None

Multiple

60 Months

Austria

E-2

None

Multiple

60 Months

Azerbaijan

E-2

None

1

3 Months

Bahrain

E-2

None

1

3 Months

Bangladesh

E-2 2

None

2

3 Months

Belgium

E-1

None

Multiple

60 Months

Belgium

E-2

None

Multiple

60 Months

Bolivia[5]

E-1

None

Multiple

60 Months

Bolivia[6]

E-2 A

None

One

3 Months

Bosnia &
Herzigovina

E-1

None

Multiple

12 Months

Bosnia &
Herzigovina

E-2

None

Multiple

12 Months

Brunei

E-1

None

Multiple

60 Months

Bulgaria

E-2

None

Multiple

60 Months

Cameroon[7]

E-2

$240.00[8]

Multiple

12 Months

Canada

E-1

$205.00

Multiple

60 Months

Canada

E-2

$205.00

Multiple

60 Months

Chile

E-1

None

Multiple

60 Months

Chile

E-2

None

Multiple

60 Months

Taiwan

E-1[9]

None

Multiple

60 Months

Taiwan

E-2[10]

None

Multiple

60 Months

Colombia

E-1

None

Multiple

60 Months

Colombia

E-2

None

Multiple

60 Months

Republic of the Congo
(Brazzaville)

E-2

None

1

3 Months

Democratic Republic of
the Congo (Kinshasa)

E-2

None

2

3 Months

Costa Rica

E-1

None

Multiple

60 Months

Costa Rica

E-2

None

Multiple

60 Months

Croatia[11]

E-1

None

Multiple

60 Months

Croatia[12]

E-2

None

Multiple

60 Months

Czech Republic[13]

E-2

$22.00

Multiple

60 Months

Denmark[14]

E-2

None

Multiple

60 Months

Ecuador

E-2

None

2

3 Months

Egypt

E-2

None

1

3 Months

Estonia

E-1

None

Multiple

60 Months

Estonia

E-2

None

Multiple

60 Months

Ethiopia

E-1

None

Multiple

60 Months

Ethiopia

E-2

None

Multiple

60 Months

France[15]

E-1

None

Multiple

60 Months

France[16]

E-2

None

Multiple

60 Months

Georgia

E-2

None

Multiple

12 Months

Germany

E-1

None

Multiple

60 Months

Germany

E-2

None

Multiple

60 Months

Greece

E-1

None

Multiple

60 Moths

Grenada

E-2

None

Multiple

60 Months

Honduras

E-1

None

Multiple

60 Months

Honduras

E-2

None

Multiple

60 Months

Iran

E-1[17]

Iran

E-2

None

1

3 Months

Ireland

E-1

None

Multiple

60 Months

Ireland

E-2

None

Multiple

60 Months

Israel

E-1

None

Multiple

60 Months

Italy

E-1

None

Multiple

60 Months

Italy

E-2

None

Multiple

60 Months

Jamaica

E-2

None

Multiple

60 Months

Japan[18]

E-1

None

Multiple

60 Months

Japan[19]

E-2

None

Multiple

60 Months

Jordan

E-1

None

1

3 Months

Jordan

E-2

None

1

3 Months

Kazakhstan

E-2

None

Multiple

12 Months

South Korea

E-1

None

Multiple

60 Months

South Korea

E-2

None

Multiple

60 Months

Kosovo[20]

E-1

None

Multiple

12 Months

Kosovo[21]

E-2

None

Multiple

12 Months

Kyrgyzstan

E-2

None

2

3 Months

Latvia

E-1

None

Multiple

60 Months

Latvia

E-2

None

Multiple

60 Months

Liberia

E-1

None

Multiple

12 Months

Liberia

E-2

None

Multiple

12 Months

Lithuania

E-2

None

Multiple

12 Months

Luxembourg

E-1

None

Multiple

60 Months

Luxembourg

E-2

None

Multiple

60 Months

Macedonia[22]

E-1

None

Multiple

60 Months

Macedonia[23]

E-2

None

Multiple

60 Months

Mexico

E-1

None

Multiple

12 Months

Mexico

E-2

None

Multiple

12 Months

Moldova

E-2

None

2

3 Months

Mongolia

E-2

None

Multiple

36 Months

Montenegro[24]

E-1

None

Multiple

12 Months

Montenegro[25]

E-2

None

Multiple

12 Months

Morocco

E-2

None

Multiple

60 Months

Netherlands[26]

E-1

None

Multiple

60 Months

Netherlands[27]

E-2

None

Multiple

60 Months

Norway[28]

E-1

None

Multiple

60 Months

Norway[29]

E-2

None

Multiple

60 Months

Oman

E-1

None

Multiple

6 Months

Oman

E-2

None

Multiple

6 Months

Pakistan

E-1

None

Multiple

60 Months

Pakistan

E-2

None

Multiple

60 Months

Panama

E-2

None

Multiple

60 Months

Paraguay

E-1

None

Multiple

60 Months

Paraguay

E-2

None

Multiple

60 Months

Philippines

E-1

None

Multiple

60 Months

Philippines

E-2

None

Multiple

60 Months

Poland

E-1

None

Multiple

12 Months

Poland

E-2

None

Multiple

12 Months

Romania

E-2

None

Multiple

60 Months

Senegal

E-2

None

Multiple

12 Months

Serbia[30]

E-1

None

Multiple

12 Months

Serbia[31]

E-2

None

Multiple

12 Months

Singapore

E-1

None

Multiple

24 Months

Singapore

E-2

None

Multiple

12 Months

Slovak Republic

E-2

None

Multiple

24 Months

Slovenia[32]

E-1

None

Multiple

60 Months

Slovenia[33]

E-2

None

Multiple

60 Months

Spain[34]

E-1

None

Multiple

60 Months

Spain[35]

E-2

None

Multiple

60 Months

Sri Lanka

E-2

None

Multiple

36 Months

Suriname[36]

E-1

None

Multiple

60 Months

Suriname[37]

E-2

None

Multiple

60 Months

Sweden

E-1

None

Multiple

24 Months

Sweden

E-2

None

Multiple

24 Months

Switzerland

E-1

None

Multiple

48 Months

Switzerland

E-2

None

Multiple

48 Months

Thailand

E-1

$15.00

Multiple

6 Months

Thailand

E-2

$15.00

Multiple

6 Months

Togo

E-1

None

Multiple

36 Months

Togo

E-2

None

Multiple

36 Months

Trinidad and Tobago

E-2

None

Multiple

60 Months

Tunisia

E-2

None

Multiple

60 Months

Turkey

E-1

None

Multiple

60 Months

Turkey

E-2

None

Multiple

60 Months

Ukraine

E-2

None

2

3 months

United Kingdom[38]

E-1

None

Multiple

60 Months

United Kingdom[39]

E-2

$105.00

Multiple

60 Months

Yugoslavia[40]

E-1

     

Yugoslavia[41]

E-2

     


[1] The E-3 visa is for nationals of the Commonwealth of Australia who wish to enter the United States to perform services in a “specialty occupation.”  The term “specialty occupation” means an occupation that requires theoretical and practical application of a body of highly specialized knowledge, and attainment of a bachelor’s or higher degree in the specific specialty (or its equivalent) as a minimum for entry into the occupation in the United States.  The definition is the same as the Immigration and Nationality Act definition of an H-1B specialty occupation.

[2] 48 months for the actual investor and immediate family; 24 months for other employees and dependents.

[3] The E-3 visa is for nationals of the Commonwealth of Australia who wish to enter the United States to perform services in a “specialty occupation.”  The term “specialty occupation” means an occupation that requires theoretical and practical application of a body of highly specialized knowledge, and attainment of a bachelor’s or higher degree in the specific specialty (or its equivalent) as a minimum for entry into the occupation in the United States.  The definition is the same as the Immigration and Nationality Act definition of an H-1B specialty occupation.

[4] 48 months for the actual investor and immediate family; 24 months for other employees and dependents.

[5] Bolivia. Bolivian nationals with qualifying investments in place in the United States by June 10, 2012 continue to be entitled to E-2 classification until June 10, 2022.  The only nationals of Bolivia (other than those qualifying for derivative status based on a familial relationship to an E-2 principal alien) who may qualify for E-2 visas at this time are those applicants who are coming to the United States to engage in E-2 activity in furtherance of covered investments established or acquired prior to June 10, 2012. The Reciprocity Table further notes: The Government of Bolivia has given notice of termination, effective June 10, 2012, for the bilateral investment treaty between the United States and Bolivia. As of June 10, 2012, the treaty ceased to have effect except that it continues to apply for another 10 years after that date to covered investments existing as of June 10, 2012. Posts must request an advisory opinion from CA/VO/L/A if the applicant: (1) previously has not received an E-2 visa or acquired E-2 status in the United States, or (2) is applying on the basis of an investment in a different commercial enterprise than the enterprise identified at the time the applicant qualified for the last E-2 visa or (if no previous E-2 visa) the change of nonimmigrant status to E-2.

[6] Id.

[7] Cameroon is unranked at this time. The Department of State’s reciprocity table lists the number of entries as “N/A.” No clarifying footnotes are listed in the Foreign Affairs Manual. An inquiry is pending with the Department of State and this post will be updated with their reply. UPDATE: On October 31, 2016 the US consulate in Cameroon confirmed by e-mail that the E visa for Cameroonian nationals is valid for multiple entries.

[8] $60.00 – For visas with a 6 month validity.

[9] In addition to the applicants eligible under the treaty trader and investor agreement, the Taiwan authorities and their derivatives are also entitled to E-1 status. Attendants and personal employees of a member of the Taiwan authorities are entitled to B-1 status.

[10] Id.

[11] Yugoslavia.  The U.S. view is that the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (SFRY) has dissolved and that the successors that formerly made up the SFRY – Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Kosovo, the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Montenegro, Serbia, and Slovenia, continue to be bound by the treaty in force with the SFRY and the time of dissolution.

[12] Id.

[13] Czech Republic and Slovak Republic.  The Treaty with the Czech and Slovak Federal Republics entered into force on December 19, 1992; it entered into force for the Czech Republic and Slovak Republic as separate states on January 1, 1993.

[14] Denmark.  The Convention of 1826 does not apply to the Faroe Islands of Greenland. The Treaty, which entered into force on July 30, 1961, does not apply to Greenland.

[15] France.  The Treaty, which entered into force on December 21, 1960, applies to the departments of Martinique, Guadeloupe, French Guiana, and Reunion. (The reciprocity schedule website states this proposition ever-so-slightly differently: The Treaty which entered into force on December 21, 1960, applies only to mainland France and the departments of Martinique, Guadeloupe, French Guiana and Reunion.)

[16] Id.

[17] With certain exceptions pertaining to personal communications, humanitarian assistance, information exchange, and personal travel arrangements, all trade with Iran was banned pursuant to an executive order of May 8, 1995. Consequently, the issuance of virtually all “E-1” visas to nationals of Iran is prohibited.

[18] Japan.  The Treaty, which entered into force on October 30, 1953, was made applicable to the Bonin Islands on June 26, 1968, and to the Ryukyu Islands on May 15, 1972.

[19] Id.

[20] Yugoslavia.  The U.S. view is that the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (SFRY) has dissolved and that the successors that formerly made up the SFRY – Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Kosovo, the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Montenegro, Serbia, and Slovenia, continue to be bound by the treaty in force with the SFRY and the time of dissolution.

[21] Id.

[22] Id.

[23] Id.

[24] Id.

[25] Id.

[26] Netherlands.  The Treaty, which entered into force on December 5, 1957, is applicable to Aruba and Netherlands Antilles.

[27] Id.

[28] Norway.  The Treaty, which entered into force on September 13, 1932, does not apply to Svalbard (Spitzbergen and certain lesser islands).

[29] Id.

[30] Yugoslavia.  The U.S. view is that the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (SFRY) has dissolved and that the successors that formerly made up the SFRY – Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Kosovo, the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Montenegro, Serbia, and Slovenia, continue to be bound by the treaty in force with the SFRY and the time of dissolution.

[31] Id.

[32] Id.

[33] Id.

[34] Spain.  The Treaty, which entered into force on April 14, 1903, is applicable to all territories.

[35] Id.

[36] Suriname.  The Treaty with the Netherlands, which entered into force December 5, 1957, was made applicable to Suriname on February 10, 1963.

[37] Id.

[38] United Kingdom.  The Convention, which entered into force on July 3, 1815, applies only to British territory in Europe (the British Isles (except the Republic of Ireland), the Channel Islands, and Gibraltar) and to “inhabitants” of such territory.  This term, as used in the Convention, means “one who resides actually and permanently in a given place, and has his domicile there.”  Also, in order to qualify for treaty trader or treaty investor status under this treaty, the alien must be a national of the United Kingdom.  Individuals having the nationality of members of the Commonwealth other than the United Kingdom do not qualify for treaty trader or treaty investor status under this treaty.

[39] Id.

[40] Yugoslavia.  The U.S. view is that the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (SFRY) has dissolved and that the successors that formerly made up the SFRY – Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Kosovo, the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Montenegro, Serbia, and Slovenia, continue to be bound by the treaty in force with the SFRY and the time of dissolution.

[41] Id.

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