COMMENTS ON PROPOSED PUBLIC CHARGE RULE – 83 FR 51114

USCIS’s proposed public charge rule violates the Due Process and Equal Protection clauses of the Fourteenth Amendment as applied to spouses of U.S. citizens. Additionally, the proposed rule exceeds USCIS’s statutory authority when applied outside the context of applications for visas, admission, or adjustment of status. Lastly USCIS has made analytical errors in studying this… Read More

Put this in your pipe and smoke it – U.S. Customs and Border Protection answers questions about Canadian cannabis users and investors seeking entry

U.S. Customs and Border Protection held a press conference today to explain its position on the admissibility of Canadians who use cannabis after it becomes legal for recreational use in Canada. According to CBP, its enforcement policies will not change in response to this change in Canadian law. As to investments in Canadian marijuana enterprises,… Read More

The admissibility of Elizabeth May

On the Jeff O’Neil Show this morning they mentioned that Elizabeth May had been charged with contempt of court. Breathlessly, the hosts proclaimed that now she “can’t cross the border.” Apparently this situation is much more benign. May has been charged with civil contempt, but the judge recommended that she be charged with criminal contempt. In either… Read More

Border Security: America’s Front Line – Season 1, Episode 7

At JFK a traveler from the Dominican Republic was questioned about his “criminal history.” During secondary inspection, inspecting officers learned that he “got picked up by DEA” the last time he was in the US. According to the traveler, they let him go after two hours. The officer then looks at the camera and says “If he’s been convicted of anything… he’s not admissible.” Read More

Prescription medication: a hidden risk when crossing the US border

Imagine traveling to the United States by car with your prescription medication in a pill organizer. You are referred to secondary inspection while officers search your car and discover your pill organizer. Later, local police arrive, inform you that you have the right to remain silent, and issue you a notice to appear in court to defend a criminal charge. Read More